Element: Unique Identifier Revised

After getting some good comments I have updated my guide lines for the Element: Identifier

Label
Identifier

Element Description
This element specifically and uniquely designates the record to provide disambiguation and exact recall.

Required?
Yes

Repeatable?
No

Guidelines for Creation of Content
The unique identifier will be built off of the file name of the image. Copy all of the file name except the file type i.e. “.jpg” into the Element and add “_Alabama_vs_” right before the name of the opposing school.

Examples
75_Alabama_vs_Southern_Mississippi_059
MFB_Alabama_vs_Texas09_KG01616

Let me know what you guys think!

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Element: Unique Identifier

Hey guys, here is my thoughts for guidelines for the Unique Identifier field let me know what you think.

Label
Unique Identifier

Element Description
This element specifically and uniquely designates the record to provide disambiguation and exact recall.

Required?
Yes

Repeatable?
No

Guidelines for Creation of Content
The unique identifier will be built off of the file name of the image. Copy all of the file name except the file type into the Element and add “_Alabama_vs_” right before the name of the opposing school. For the black and white images include a lower case ‘b’ at the end of the name to indicate that the scan is the second iteration of the image.

Examples
75_Alabama_vs_Southern_Mississippi_059
MFB_Alabama_vs_Texas09_KG01616
MFB_Alabama_vs_Texas09_KG01637b

Let me know what you guys think!

Keeping Track of the Versions

File naming is an important aspect of data management. Creating files that are systematically named ensures that files are easy to access, that edits are tracked, and that old versions of files don’t accidentally overwrite new versions. As I’m considering using files names of images to serve as a unique identifiers in our schema file naming is something to blog about. ensuring that one file does not accidentally overwrite another file in a different location when either file is moved is a concern. One way to manage this is to keep careful track of any changes made to the file by editing the file name with an addendum either a final number which can be changed to reflect the number of the version or by using an alphabetical variant a,b,c etc. My classmate shows a great example of this in her blog here.

When building our schema, we are trying to consider making sure that the data and elements are relevant and clear even if the files were shared and used in another database. If the other library also used file names as unique identifier there could be duplication in the records. To make sure that our files were clear and unique Dr. MacCall recommended putting some identifier that Alabama was playing, as the current file names only list the opposing teams. I suggest we enter something like this “Alabama_vs_” into the middle of the file name right before the opponent name. As a further way to reduce duplication or to simply follow naming protocol we could add a letter to the end of the file name especially for the scanned photos to indicate that they were not taken digitally. Thoughts?

File name as Unique Identifier?

In many ways I think I got the easiest element of the schema. I simply have to create rules for assigning a unique identifier for each image. I think Dr. MacCall had a good idea from class about simply using the file names of the images as a unique ID. He also suggested adding some identifier of Alabama so that if our schema is used in other databases both the home and opponent names could be known from the unique ID. I think using the file name has a lot of merit as the file names have a lot of good information already embedded into it. The three digit numbers at the end of the file name are likely simply the number of pictures taken and that number might give valuable information as to the image’s relation to other pictures in the game. For instance two of my photos are one number after the other and may be in the same play. This information could be useful when trying to identify relationships between photos.

And more Schema.org

So I know I’ve done posts on microformats before where I mentioned schema.org, but I’ve gotten excited it about it again and had to do another post. I read this post, which rather than waxing poetical about schema.org and how it works just shows it in context with a little example. By using a schema, search engines can find the blog’s cocktail recipe and know that it is a recipe because of the coding.

I have a lot of friends who write creative fiction and one who is using her blog to build backgrounds for the world of her book, introduce characters, and generally flesh out her universe. Schema.org has a schema for creative works and specifically for blogs. My friend could start incorporating this schema and build a hierarchy for her characters that is visible to search engines as well as naming herself as the creator for each piece and establishing authorship.

Blog Questions Response

One of my classmates posted a very interesting blog on technological skills in Library and Information Science work. I won’t answer all of them as I don’t have opinions on all of the questions, but here are some of my thoughts. Here is his original post.

1. What do you define as “tech skills”?

I think the broad definition is being able to use the tools at your given library to serve the population. I would think “tech skills” encompasses everything from troubleshooting computers to using XML and HTML to update the library webpage.

2. Which types of “tech skills” (broadly defined) have you found to be particularly useful in your work environments?

A few common ones spring to mind like being comfortable with Microsoft Office, but right now I am seeing the importance of reference skills such as being familiar and comfortable with the databases my library supports and knowing how to sift through results for good information.

5. How important do you think “soft skills” (communication, interpersonal skills, etc.) are for LIS professionals?

Personally I think they are some of the most important skills in a librarians’ tool kit. Being able to find the right information or fix the problem doesn’t mean much if the patron feels like an idiot by the end of the process. Being able to present information, assistance, and even teaching information literacy skills in a friendly and non-threatening manner is a skill I think all librarians need to know. Even if the librarian doesn’t work with the public a great deal being able to understand the patrons’ concerns and work with the other librarians to serve them is a must.

Facial Recognition

Image Retrieval: Benchmarking Visual Information Indexing and Retrieval Systems. This article was published in 2007 and it  has made me curious as to what advancements have been made to image retrieval since that time. It also makes me curious if situations like tagging friends in Facebook photos would be an example of a combination of content and concept indexing. When humans select and tag friends faces Facebook then, I assume, uses that information to compare other photos against the tagged photos and prompts the user to select if the identified person matches the original entered name. I wonder if that software is proprietary or if it simply requires too much human input to be useful.

Controlled Vocabularies

Controlled vocabularies make my day. They help streamline processes and assist catalogers by providing a set list of terms from which to select to describe a given item or document. The entire premise of controlled vocabularies, as I understand them, is that by describing items in the same way information organizations make organizing, retrieving, and selecting information much easier for everyone.

This article goes into depth about the how and somewhat of the why of creating a controlled vocabulary. I really enjoyed it as the article follows a logical progression of how to create a CV. The first step of the processes is to define the scope of the CV. Everything that follows hinges on that scope, how big, to what depth, who will the CV serve all these questions are involved in the question of scope. I often wish we had a CV for say the internet, but the scope of that project would be so large as to be useless even if people would follow it. I was glad to see that later in the article, there was a discussion of crosswalks and how to transfer information from one system using a CV to another system. For as much as I love CV having a ton of silo CV’s can’t be the best answer.

Building Controlled Vocabularies for Metadata Harmonization http://www.asis.org/Bulletin/Dec-12/DecJan13_Zaharee.html

Information Overload

My class mate over at Library Corner wrote a very interesting blog post titled “The Future is Ours”. In it she mentions how we are taking control of writing our own histories via blogs, twitter, and other social media. Instead of history being written by the victor history will be written by its subject. She also brings up a valid concern, the ability for people to keep up with all these personal histories. For instance if you have a hundred blogs from a hundred different view points of a certain event your average reader isn’t going to read a hundred blogs but one or two of the most well rated ones. Even as our ability to disseminate information increases via the internet information overload becomes a real problem.

Information overload is a concern that can only really be handled through organization. And the author of Library Corner makes a very good point that Metadata is one of the ways to organize this information. With proper metadata use and attaching a tweet to a popular hashtag it is possible for even a little known author to have their information seen by others.